HISTORY OF THE REDBONE

 

Years ago, most coon hunters who owned a red dog of unknown ancestry, but proven ability in tracking and treeing raccoons, called his dog a "Redbone." Then a few serious breeders who were devoted both to the breed and the sport began a campaign of selective breeding to produce a hound with the necessary characteristics to make a superior coonhound and that would breed true to type in color and conformation.

 

   The foundation stock of the modern day Redbone came from George F. L. Birdsong of Georgia, who was a noted foxhunter and breeder. He obtained the pack of Dr. Thomas Henry in the 1840s.

As is the case with most of the other coonhound breeds, the ancestors of the Redbone were foxhounds. A Bloodhound cross is said to have been made, and it's also believed that the blood of the Irish hounds was also introduced later. This latter cross is said to account for the white chest and feet markings which still occasionally show up in Redbone pups today. The first dogs were commonly called "saddlebacks." The background color was red, and most of them possessed black saddle markings. By selective breeding, the black saddle was bred out, and the solid red dogs became known as Redbone Coonhounds.

   The Redbone was the second coonhound breed to be registered with UKC, the first being registered in 1902, two years after the American Black & Tan. The breed is a relative newcomer to AKC, with the its first year of competition eligibility being in 2010.

    Of the six coonhound breeds, the Redbone is probably the most uniform as to type and size. The breed is distinguished by a medium build, pleading eyes and a "sweet" voice. The rich, deep red color makes the Redbone a striking dog to look at. The Redbone is known to be a well-balanced breed, making them adaptable to various types of hunting and terrain. Their agility benefits them when hunting in fenced country or steep, rocky ground. Redbones are known to make excellent water dogs.

Official AKC Breed Standard

 

General Appearance:

Hunted from swamplands to mountains, the Redbone is surefooted and

swift, even on the most difficult terrain. Well balanced, with a flashy red coat and excellent cold

nose, the powerfully built Redbone mingles handsome looks with a confident air and fine hunting talents.

 

Size, Proportion, Substance:

Size

Males

22 to 27 inches

Females

21 to 26 inches

Mi-range dog preferred.

 

Proportion

Length well proportioned to height. Should be equal in height from highest point of the shoulder blade to the ground as long measured from sternum to the buttocks. Slightly taller at shoulder than at hips.

 

Substance

Weight should be in proportion with height and bone structure. Working dogs not to be penalized for being slightly underweight.

Well boned according to size of dog.

 

Head:

Expression

Pleading

 

Eyes

Dark brown to hazel in color, dark preferred. Set well apart. No drooping eyelinds. Eyes round in shape.

Faults

Yellow eyes, drooping eyelids.


Ears

Set moderately low, fine in texture. Reaching near the end of the nose when stretched out.

Proportioned to head.

Faults

Stiff to the touch. Appearing to be attached only to the skin, instead

of firmly attached to the head.

 

Skull

Moderately broad. Shape is flat.

Faults

Narrow across top, excess of dome, pointed dome.

 

Muzzle

Square. Well balanced with other features of the head.

Faults

Dished or upturned muzzle. Not in proportion with head.

 

Nose

Nostrils large and open,black in color, never pink.

Faults

Any color other than black.

 

Teeth

Scissors bite preferred. Even bite acceptable.

Faults

Overshot or undershot.

 

Neck, Topline and Body:

Neck

Medium in length, strong, slightly arched and held erect,

denoting proudness.

Throat

Slight fold of skin below the angle of jaw, clean throat is

permissible.

Faults

Too long, too thick, not in proportion with head and body.

 

Topline

slightly taller at the withers than at the hips.

Faults

Hips higher than withers.

 

Body

Chest

Deep, broad.

Ribs

Well sprung to provide optimal lung capacity, denoting stamina.

 

Back

Strong.

Faults

Roach or sway back.

 

Loin

Slightly arched.

 

Tail

Medium length, very slight brush and saber like.

Faults

Not strong at root, heavy brush, Setter like plume, curl tail.

 

Forequarters:

Shoulder

Clean and muscular. Shoulder angulation should have a perfect

90 degree angle or close.

 

Legs

Straight, wellboned.

The forelegs will be set under dog and feet under his withers, not under ears.

 

Pasterns

Straight, well set, clean and muscular, denoting

both speed and strength.

Faults

Forelegs crooked, out at elbows.

 

Feet

Cat paw type, compact, well padded.

Toes

Stout,strong and well arched.

Nails

Well set.

Faults

Flat feet, open feet, hind dewclaws.

 

Hindquarters:

Thighs

Clean and muscular.

Fault

Cowhocked.

Hindquarters should have the same angulation as the forequart

same angulation as the forequarters. Well boned.

 

Coat

Short, smooth, coarse enough to provide protection.

 

Color

Solid red preferred. Dark muzzle and small amount of white on brisket and feet permissible.

Faults

White on feet extending beyond toes. More white on brisket than an open

hand will cover. White stockings on legs.

 

Gait

:Determined, steady, and proud, with good reach and drive.

 

Temperament

Even tempered at home but an aggressive hunter. Amenable to formal training.

A good family dog that likes to please. 

NRCC Health Testing Policy

Most Redbone breeders and owners regard it as an extremely healthy breed. This being the case, the National Redbone Coonhound Club does not make testing for genetic health issues a requirement of breeders for their membership with this organization. The NRCC encourages all Redbone breeders to conduct health testing if they feel it necessary for the betterment of their breeding programs.